Chronic pain and workers’ compensation

When you imagine a work injury, you might think of a construction accident. It is easy to picture a sudden mishap, which leads to an instantaneous injury. This type of incident might result in a crushed leg or broken arm. However, some work-related problems develop inconspicuously. For example, employers have recently witnessed more complaints concerning chronic pain injuries.

According to a medical professional from the Liberty Mutual Insurance in Boston, Massachusetts, chronic pain is defined as "any injury in which pain is as important as the disease and (the duration) is beyond the normal course of the injury." Medical professionals will attest to the fact that chronic pain is similar to becoming disabled.

In fact, Business Insurance reports that chronic pain is a problem for approximately 116 million Americans, and the issue can cost $635 billion each year in medical costs and associated expenses. The treatment might involve rehabilitative, neurological, orthopedic and psychological services.

What is contributing to the increase in chronic pain claims? Some point to the increasing age of the workforce. People are working longer, and older individuals are more likely to suffer from other health issues.

Also, some people hold the cavalier attitude that it is important to work through pain. However, to prevent a serious injury from evolving into chronic pain, it is important to receive treatment right away. In fact, some medical professionals have developed ways to identify small tissue issues (smaller claims), which could potentially escalate into high-cost compensation claims. Many small-tissue matters can quickly transform into serious physical problems.

Ultimately, the problem affects more individuals than the number of cancer, heart disease and diabetes suffers combined. If you are interested in pursuing medical treatment for a chronic pain condition that is connected to your employment, you should speak to a legal professional that specializes in workers' compensation claims.

When you are dealing with a work-related injury in Minnesota, for example, a doctor of your choice can evaluate you. While your employer may provide medical options, you do not have to pursue them. A doctor can help analyze your condition and point to factors that may be contributing to the work-related injury. It might be the case that an existing injury has been aggravated by your work activities. This is often true for suffers of chronic pain.

If you have been injured on the job or you suffer from the conditions of your employment, you should look into your legal options with a local workers' compensation attorney. A lawyer can help you pursue any available workers' compensation benefits.